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Graphene Council Champions Graphene Standards

Posted By Dexter Johnson, IEEE Spectrum, Thursday, May 3, 2018

The Graphene Council has consistently been spearheading the development of standards around graphene. This is for good reason.

Ask just about any company involved in bringing graphene and graphene-enabled products to market—as we have—and  you will quickly realize that all these organizations consider standardization of the material as a critical need for the wider adoption of graphene.

To further heighten awareness of this issue, The Graphene Council recently contributed an article  to The Graphene Technology Journal published by Springer and Nature in which we conducted an interview with Norbert Fabricius, who is one of the leading authorities on the development of standards around graphene.

Of course, we have also interviewed our own Executive Director, Terrance Barkan, on how the industry can collectively accelerate the development of standards for graphene.  

After all this effort, others are beginning to seek us out to learn more about the development of standards related to graphene. In an interview with SciTech Europa, Barkan provides an in-depth look at where standards for graphene are now and their importance going forward. 

In this interview, Barkan references the Global Graphene Industry Survey and Report produced by The Graphene Council that even two years after its publication remains the most extensive survey of producers and users of graphene. Barkan also references some of the recent groundbreaking work that the Council is doing in educating the industry into how graphene can best be used in composites and plastics.

It appears the word is getting out about the quality of the studies and projects the Council has undertaken over the years in leading industry efforts from standards to health and safety issues and promoting greater understanding of how graphene fits into the value chain of a range of industries

Tags:  composites  health and safety  plastics  Standards  survey 

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The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the University of Manchester have published a good practice guide on the characterisation of graphene.

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Sunday, November 5, 2017
Updated: Sunday, November 5, 2017

Graphene, the world's first two-dimensional material, is many times stronger than steel, more conductive than copper, lightweight, flexible and one million times thinner than a human hair.

 

Graphene is set to improve the quality of life for many across the globe. Potential applications include inexpensive water purification systems; greener, more efficient cars and planes; flexible phones and even biomedical applications such as wound healing and cancer treatments.

 

Graphene’s commercial adoption will be accelerated by answering two key questions: what are the characteristics of commercially-supplied graphene? And how can they be used to best effect?

 

The establishment of common industrial metrics, regarding for example the number of layers or flake size, is crucial for the uptake of graphene-based technologies.

 

The National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester has partnered with NPL to produce a guide, as part of NPL's good practice guide series, that aims to tackle the ambiguity surrounding how to measure graphene’s characteristics.

 

Titled Characterisation of the Structure of Graphene, the guide provides producers and users of graphene with an understanding of how to reliably measure the structural properties of graphene.

Material standardisation is crucial for industry uptake. There are many early adopters of graphene but without standardisation it is difficult for industry to be assured of the quality and properties of its graphene samples.

 

This guide seeks to address this gap and brings together the accepted measurement techniques in this area. It describes the high-accuracy and precision required for verification of material properties and will enable the development of other faster quality control techniques in the future.

 

Intended to form a bedrock for future interlaboratory comparisons and international standards, the guide will accelerate the development of graphene-enabled technology and improve the ability to produce graphene in a reliable and repeatable way.

 

Dr Andrew Pollard, lead author of the guide and Senior Research Scientist at NPL, commented:

 

"Although there are many ways to measure the properties of different types of commercially-available ‘graphene’, industry needs a standardised set of measurements. This will enable companies to select the type of material best suited to their needs by reliably comparing key characteristics, supporting the development of innovative new technologies based on graphene. This guide is the first step in this process, and as the basis of international measurement standards currently being developed, will provide measurement protocols that can be used in the interim."

 

James Baker, Graphene Business Director at the University of Manchester, said:

 

"This good practice guide has been developed by the NGI and NPL teams to allow the nascent graphene industry to perform accurate, reproducible and comparable measurements of commercially supplied graphene. This will address this important commercialisation barrier by providing users with a consistent approach to the structural characterisation of graphene whilst international measurement standards are being developed".

 

 

ISO Publishes ISO/TS 80004-13:2017(en)

 

Nanotechnologies — Vocabulary — Part 13: Graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) materials

 

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies. The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical committees. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

 

The Graphene Council is proud to be a formal member of both, the ISO/ANSI TC 229 Nanotechnology Standards Development Group as well as the USNC Technical Advisory Group to IEC TC 113, Nano-Electrotechnologies.

 

Our focus is on the development of standards that will benefit suppliers, buyers and users. We firmly believe that clear standards will foster greater adoption of graphene and graphene related products. 

 

We would like to thank the volunteer members of The Graphene Council Standards Task Force that helped contribute to the development of this document. 

 

It is intended to facilitate communication between organizations and individuals in research, industry and other interested parties and those who interact with them. 

 

ISO/TS 80004-13:2017(en) Nanotechnologies — Vocabulary — Part 13: Graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) materials

 

Tags:  Characterization  Graphene  Measurements  NPL  Standards 

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The World’s Largest Graphene Community Adds Tenth Corporate Member

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Monday, July 31, 2017

The efforts of The Graphene Council in providing information to the graphene community receives strong corporate support. 

 

The Graphene Council, the largest member-driven community in the world focused on graphene research and commercialization, has reached a key milestone by adding its tenth corporate member bolstering its efforts in representing and providing information to the graphene community. 

 

The newest members, UK-based Haydale Graphene Industries  and Australia-based Talga Resources, join an international group of leading graphene companies that includes Montreal-based NanoXplore, Australia-based Imagine Intelligent Materials (Imagine IM), UK-based Applied Graphene Materials, Norway-based CealTech AS,   UK-based William Blythe, Hong Kong-based Perfect Right Limited (Oovao Powers) and Australian First Graphite. In addition the US-based association SPIE—the International Society for Optics and Photonics has also seen value in becoming a Corporate Member and taking advantage of up-to-date market intelligence and other benefits.

 

Representing graphene producers on four continents, these leading companies and association recognize the value of sharing and disseminating information across an open platform where the views and issues surrounding graphene research and commercialization can be advanced.

 

“Partnering with other organizations to further the sharing of information and enhancing the discussion around technologies not only helps SPIE meet its charter but, more importantly, enables the advancement of research, science, engineering and practical applications in these technologies,” said Robert F. Hainsey, Ph.D., the Director of Science and Technology for SPIE.

 

Established in late 2013, The Graphene Council quickly developed the largest LinkedIn group in the field of graphene and an even larger private community with 8,500 members. It has significantly expanded its reach and impact through original market survey reports and by providing original content in newsletters, articles and blogs.

 

One of the first providers of online webinars dedicated to the commercial issues surrounding graphene, The Graphene Council has also researched and published one of the most extensive surveys of companies producing graphene on the status of commercialization and highlighting major issues. This survey has also served as a key document in government-led analysis of the graphene market.

 

The Graphene Council is also the sole provider of the 2017 Bulk Graphene Pricing Report, the most up-to-date and detailed analysis of how graphene can compete in application areas that includes composites, thermo plastics, 3D manufacturing, rubber and plastics, cement, lubricants and many others.  

 

The Graphene Council has also partnered with Springer Nature publications to publish the first academic journal dedicated to applied graphene research and analysis, The Graphene Technology Journalthe first full issue will be published in September 2017.

 

As a formal member of the ISO/ANSI TC 229 Nanotechnology Standards Development Group as well as the IEC TC 113 Nano-Electrotechnologies, the Graphene Council is at the forefront of the development of graphene standards that will benefit graphene suppliers, buyers and users.

 

For more information about joining the leading community in the world for graphene professionals, please visit The Graphene Council.

 

Contact:

 

Terrance Barkan CAE, Executive Director
Direct:  +1 202 294 5563

tbarkan@thegraphenecouncil.org


Tags:  Applied Graphene Materials  Bulk Graphene Pricing  CealTech  First Graphite  Graphene Technology Journal  Handle  IM  Imagine Intelligent Materials  NanoXplore  Oovao Powers  Perfect Right Limited  SPIE  Standards  Talga  William Blythe 

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Graphene Certification Needed

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Wednesday, November 9, 2016

One of the major problems identified in our survey of the global graphene community was the lack of agreed standards for graphene materials.

In addition, there is a tremendous lack of transparency into the actual quality and characteristics of material that is being produced and sold as "graphene".

Survey respondents reported that batches of graphene were often inconsistent (even from the same producer) or were not material that could seriously be considered graphene. (More like micro-graphite). 


This is not only a problem for customers, researchers and users of purchased materials, it is a problem for legitimate graphene producers to differentiate themselves from companies that claim to be selling graphene but that are instead producing some other forms of carbon containing materials. 

The lack of an agreed global standard for graphene and closely related materials creates a vacuum and lack of trust in the marketplace for industrial scale adoption of graphene materials. This is true even though forms of graphene and reduced graphene oxide have proven to provide outstanding performance improvements in composites, inks and 3D filaments to name but a few examples. 

I would like to hear from you if you agree with this view and if you feel that the establishment of a regime to certify the quality / characteristics of commercially available graphene products is a good idea. 

Feel free to post a reply or send me a private message directly at: 
tbarkan@thegrapheneconcil.org

You can also see the original postings in our LinkedIn group at: 
http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Graphene-Council-5153830/about

Tags:  Certification  Developers  Graphene  Producers  Standards  Survey  Testing  Users 

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