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Women in Graphene Career Development Day

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, February 4, 2019
Updated: Monday, February 4, 2019

The "Women In Graphene" initiative within the Graphene Flagship has been set up to help support women and create a more gender diverse scientific community. It aims to connect women working in graphene through biannual meetings and peer to peer support.



Many industries are faced with problems when it comes to gender equality. For example, 99% of female chemists experience a lack of progression in their sector, according to evidence given by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

The Graphene Flagship, one of our Future & Emerging Technologies (FET) Flagships will host a two day programme – the Women in Graphene Career Development Day – with seminars and workshops aiming to encourage diversity within this field’s community.

This will take place at the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester, UK between 11 and 12 February 2019 to coincide with the International Day of Women and Girls in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) with the objective of establishing a peer-to-peer support network and reoccurring bi-annual meetings.

NOTICE: THIS EVENT IS NOW FULLY BOOKED!


Tags:  Graphene  The Graphene Flagship 

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Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, January 28, 2019
Updated: Friday, January 25, 2019

As the drive to commercialise graphene continues, it is important that all safety aspects are thoroughly researched and understood. The Graphene Flagship project has a dedicated Work Package studying the impact of graphene and related materials on our health, as well as their environmental impact. This enables safety by design to become a core part of innovation.



Researches and companies are currently using a range of materials such as few layered graphene, graphene oxide and heterostructures. The first step to assess the toxicology is to fully characterise these materials. This work overviews the production and characterisation methods, and considers different materials, which biological effects depend on their inherent properties.

"One of the key messages is that this family of materials has varying properties, thus displaying varying biological effects. It is important to emphasize the need not only for a systematic analysis of well-characterized graphene-based materials, but also the importance of using standardised in vitro or in vivo assays for the safety assessment," says Bengt Fadeel, lead author of this paper working at Graphene Flagship partner Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.

"This review correlates the physicochemical characteristics of graphene and related materials to the biological effects. A classification based on lateral dimensions, number of layers and carbon-to-oxygen ratio allows us to describe the parameters that can alter graphene's toxicology. This can orient future development and use of these materials," explains Alberto Bianco, from Graphene Flagship partner CNRS, France and deputy leader of the Graphene Flagship Work Package on Health and Environment.

The paper gives a comprehensive overview of all aspects of graphene health and environmental impact, focussing on the potential interactions of graphene-based materials with key target organs including immune system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system, reproductive system, as well as a wide range of other organisms including bacteria, algae, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates in various ecosystems.

"One cannot draw conclusions from previous work on other carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes and extrapolate to graphene. Graphene-based materials are less cytotoxic when compared to carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide is readily degradable by cells of the immune system," comments Fadeel.

Andrea C. Ferrari, Science and Technology Officer of the Graphene Flagship and Chair of its Management Panel added that "understanding any potential Health and Environmental impacts of graphene and related materials has been at the core of all Graphene Flagship activities since day one. This review provides a solid guide for the safe use of these materials, a key step towards their widespread utilization as targeted by our innovation and technology roadmap."

Tags:  Graphene  graphene oxide  Healthcare  The Graphene Flagship 

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Graphene Flagship Achieving Real Results!

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Sunday, October 8, 2017

The Graphene Flagship is the EU's largest ever research initiative with more than 150 partners in over 20 European countries.

Since early 2017, 15 new partners have been accepted and the number of Associated Members and Partnering Projects continues to grow, adding value to the joint graphene and related materials research effort.

According to European Commission's interim review report of the project's first year following the two-and-half-year ramp-up phase, the Graphene Flagship has achieved most of its objectives and milestones and has delivered exceptional results with significant immediate or potential impact.

The Graphene Flagship consortia has produced over 600 scientific publications, 37 patent applications, 17 products on the market and six spin-off companies during this 12-month period.

The Graphene Flagship is further commended for focusing its work towards a more industrially oriented initiative with a higher Technology Readiness Level.

"We are glad to have received such a positive evaluation feedback from the European Commission as it is an important acknowledgement that we are progressing in the right direction towards our overall goal, which is taking graphene and related materials from academic laboratories to the factory floor," says Jari Kinaret, Director of the Graphene Flagship.

Significant results close to commercial exploitation mentioned in the report include the Airbus winglet made of graphene composites, a motorcycle helmet with a graphene coating, a new viscoelastic graphene-polymer sensor material, perovskite photovoltaic cells with improved stability and a demonstration of tuneable ion sieving using GO membrane for water desalination.

Graphene enhanced helmet by Italian Graphene Flagship partner IIT and MomoDesign on display at Composites Europe in Düsseldorf - Courtesy of Graphene Flagship

These achievements are all the more impressive when considering how long it has traditionally taken a new material to break through to commercial application. 

As stated in this recent blog, Thomas Skordas, the EU Director "Digital Excellence and Science Infrastructure" at the Directorate General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology (DG CONNECT) said;

"Firstly, it takes time to do research and generate good results. Usually up to 20 years is needed for a new material to find its way to market. Thanks to its long lasting collaboration between academia and industry, Graphene Flagship proves that this process can be substantially accelerated, contributing to shortening drastically the cycle from research to innovation.  The results start showing that this is a valuable research and innovation model."

We couldn't agree more. 

The mission of The Graphene Council is to support the commercial adoption of graphene, world-wide.

We congratulate the Graphene Flagship and its many partners on the progress they are making and wherever possible, we will continue to support and compliment those efforts. 

***

For more information, download a summary of the Graphene Flagship Review Report

Tags:  Commer  EU  European Union  Graphene Helmet  Jari Kinaret  The Graphene Flagship  Thomas Skodas 

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Graphene and CMOS Become One, Offering New Hope in Electronics

Posted By Dexter Johnson, IEEE Spectrum, Friday, June 9, 2017

 

 

Complimentary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS) have served as the backbone of the electronics industry for over four decades.  However, the last decade has been marked by increasing concerns that CMOS will not be able to continue to meet the demands of Moore’s Law in which the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years. If CMOS is going to continue to be a force in electronics, it will become necessary to integrate CMOS with other semiconductor materials other than silicon.

It appears that research out of The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona (ICFO) and supported by The Graphene Flagship has found a way to integrate graphene into a CMOS integrated circuit

In research described in the journal Nature Photonics, the ICFO researchers combined the graphene-CMOS device with quantum dots to create an array of photodetectors.

While the photodetector arrays could enable digital cameras capable of seeing UV, visible and infrared light simultaneously, the technology could have a wide range of applications, including microelectronics to low-power photonics.

“The development of this monolithic CMOS-based image sensor represents a milestone for low-cost, high-resolution broadband and hyperspectral imaging systems" said, Frank Koppens, a professor at ICFO in a press release.

Koppens, who The Graphene Council interviewed back in 2015believes that "in general, graphene-CMOS technology will enable a vast amount of applications, that range from safety, security, low cost pocket and smartphone cameras, fire control systems, passive night vision and night surveillance cameras, automotive sensor systems, medical imaging applications, food and pharmaceutical inspection to environmental monitoring, to name a few."

The researchers were able to integrate the graphene and quantum dots into a CMOS chip by first depositing the graphene on the CMOS chip. Then this graphene layer is patterned to define the pixel shape. Finally a layer of quantum dots is added.

“No complex material processing or growth processes were required to achieve this graphene-quantum dot CMOS image sensor,” said Stijn Goossens, another researcher from ICFO in Barcelona. “It proved easy and cheap to fabricate at room temperature and under ambient conditions, which signifies a considerable decrease in production costs. Even more, because of its properties, it can be easily integrated on flexible substrates as well as CMOS-type integrated circuits."

The graphene-enabled CMOS chip achieves its photoresponse through something called the photogating effect, which starts as the quantum dot layer absorbs light and transfers it as photo-generated holes or electrons to the graphene. These holes or electrons move through the material because of a bias voltage applied between two pixel contacts. The photo signal triggers a change in the conductivity of the graphene and it is this change that is sensed. Because graphene has such high conductivity, a small change can be quickly detected giving the device extraordinary sensitivity.

Andrea Ferrari, science and Technology offficer of the Graphene Flagship added: "The integration of graphene with CMOS technology is a cornerstone for the future implementation of graphene in consumer electronics. This work is a key first step, clearly demonstrating the feasibility of this approach.”

Tags:  CMOS  digital cameras  graphene  low-power photonics  quantum dots  The Graphene Flagship 

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